Heart Container Cookies – The Legend of Zelda series

heart cookies 2
Valentines Day is one of those holidays I just don’t get excited about like so many others seem to get delirious over. I personally associate the day with piles of terrible candy covered in pink and red tat with a dash of cheap novelty greeting cards. However, in my utmost determination to disassociate myself from these negative ideas of v-day, I thought I’d make something awesome to take my mind away from the mountains of gaudy baubles pawned off on naive lovebirds.

Heart Containers were an easy choice. Who wouldn’t love someone that gave them the gift of extra health? I know I would! One if the most rewarding things about a Zelda game, especially later on, is having an absolute ton of hearts. Unless of course you consider yourself more the type of person that walks a dangerous road and chooses to skip heart collecting. Either way, fans of both approaches can appreciate the importance of keeping your heart containers full. Or maybe empty, in the case of these cookies.

Fun Fact: There were actually three Oracle games planned, but due to time restraints, the third was scrapped.

INGREDIENTStumblr_m5mwji1Ojq1r7fk2zo1_500
3 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup unsalted butter, room temperature
1 1/4 cups sugar
4 large egg yolks
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
Very finely crushed red hard candy, about 1 cup (I used a raspberry drop candy I happened across at the supermarket)
For glaze:
1 cup icing sugar
1 tablespoon milk

DIRECTIONSheart cookie
Whisk together flour, baking powder, and salt. In a large bowl, beat butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add egg yolks and vanilla and beat to combine. Slowly add flour mixture and beat to combine. Form dough into 2 equal balls, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Working with 1 disk at a time, roll out dough between floured parchment paper to 1/8-inch thickness. Stack dough in parchment on a baking sheet; refrigerate until firm, 30 minutes. Cut out heart shapes using cookie cutters or, if none are available, cut out shapes using a clean, non-perforated knife. Place cookies, 1 inch apart, on well greased tin foil baking sheets (this makes it easier to get the glassy hard candy center off the foil). Bake until cookies are pale but set, 5 to 10 minutes. Remove sheets from oven; fill cutouts with crushed candy. Bake until cookies begin to brown at edges and candy is melted, 3 minutes. Let cool completely on sheets on wire racks.
Mix icing sugar and milk together then apply to the outside cookie and let set.

Fun Fact: The Pols Voice monster in The Legend of Zelda was originally meant to be defeated by screaming into a microphone for the NES. It was, however, scrapped in the US, and only applied to the Japanese Famicom version. The US manual still refers to them “disliking loud noises”.

DIFFICULTY: TWO MOOGLES
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Professor Layton Hint Coin Cookies

cookies

What are those things that…you know…help you solve puzzles with clues in Layton games…? Gimme a hint?!

Ah, that’s it, hint coins. Playing Layton games would probably be darn near impossible without cheating or being a genius. And it just wouldn’t be the same game without frantically tapping around the touch pad, scouring the area for coins. It would be invaluable having some of those in real life (and possibly use them in Who Wants To Be A Millionaire). So why not? And while we’re at it we can make them sugar cookies.

Fun Fact: The Laytonmobile is built with a high ceiling to accommodate Layton’s hat which he never takes off. Despite its good condition, Luke believes that nobody would want to steal it.

Creating the stamp was a puzzle in itself

Creating the stamp was a puzzle in itself

I had to get a bit crafty with this, and by me I mean my husband and I (thanks Tom!). Trying to solve the puzzle of how to create the iconic Layton logo, and keep it food friendly at the same time needed no hint coin. Ruling out clays and polymers, for obvious reasons, I chose to make a normal stamp out of salt dough, which hardens to about the consistency of a rock when baked at a low heat over a long period of time. Again, with Tom and I flexing our creative muscles, we were able to sculpt a replica of the Layton seal using one parts salt, one parts water and two parts flour. It’s funny how something you learned in kindergarden is still handy to this day. Despite losing a few picarats trying to solve the stamp conundrum, it turned out pretty great in the end. I included the recipe I use for sugar cookies as well. By far this is my favourite recipe, its easy and comes out great every time without much spread.

Sugar Cookies:
1 cup of unsalted butter, softened
1 1/2 cups icing sugar
1 egg, room temperature
2-3 teaspoons of vanilla extract
2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt

“Gold” glaze:
1 egg white
2 1/2 teaspoons of yellow dye
Optional: 2 tablespoons maple syrup (These cookies are sweet, but I have a greater sweet tooth.)
Optional: If you want to kick these up one more notch, gold food colouring spray is also available. Unfortunately, I live in the middle of nowhere.

Cream together softened butter and confectioner’s sugar. Add egg and the vanilla extract. Mix until the egg is thoroughly incorporated, it may separate then come back together. In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt, then add little by little to the mixture. Mix well, dough is ready when I touch it, it has a little give, but does not stick to my fingers.

[Recommended but optional] Refrigerate dough until chilled, this makes rolling, cutting and stamping much easier. Roll out on parchment to about 1/4 an inch thick, use flour for dusting as necessary.

Ready for the oven

Ready for the oven

Then, stamp, cut and bake at 400 degrees for 7-8 minutes. Make sure to take cookies out before they begin to brown.

While cookies are baking prepare the golden glaze. Mix egg white and yellow dye together (and maple syrup). Immediately upon taking cookies out of the oven brush mix over cookies using a pastry brush.

This version makes about 9 large hint coins.

Fun Fact: Most of the voice actors in the English-language release of the games put on fake British accents. Actual British-English test players of the game reportedly hated Lani Minella’s mockney accent for Luke so much that the British edition completely redubs Luke’s lines with English-born Maria Darling. Christopher Robin Miller, however, put on an accent for the Professor so convincing that many players think he is British.


DIFFICULTY: ONE MOOGLE
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